Nouya Chen:  University of Edinburgh, China

“Volunteering with WindAid was one of the most incredible experiences I’ve ever had. Two months I’ve met and worked with many incredibly-talented and inspiring people, from all over the world, some of whom come from the same town I had lived, some of whom I travelled with all the way cross the world in Peru, some of whom we are still planning on travelling together after the project. To me the two-month experience of volunteering with WindAid is not only about building the wind turbine and deliver it to a community that needs electricity, it is more about the people who I met along the journey and what I learnt from this experience. I have been exposed to so many different ways of living, different values of life, many different perspectives of the idea on making the world a better place and it encourages me to keep stepping out of my comfort zone everyday and explore more, to be more creative, be more friendly, be more aware of the world, be a better person than the one I was yesterday.”

Renata Hegyi: Energy Systems Engineering, Dartmouth College – Hungary

“I’ve had an incredible month with WindAid. I could not have imagined a better way to learn about wind turbines, manufacturing, construction, Peru and energy engineering. The WindAid team is passionate, dedicated, smart, caring, and so fun. Working with volunteers from all over the world made the experience even more special. I learned first hand what goes into building a wind turbine from scratch and watched how it impacted the lives of a Peruvian community for the better. I also received a great introduction to Peruvian culture, practiced my Spanish a lot, and traveled a bit on the weekends with the other volunteers. I left Peru with a stronger sense of direction, inspiration, and life long memories. Regresaré pronto! Gracias por todo, WindAid. ”

Mike Davis : England – Mechanical Engineering at University of Exeter

“I loved every minute of my time in Peru, whether in the workshop, at the installation in Playa Blanca or travelling around at the weekends! I honestly never imagined I’d have the opportunity to Sand board in Trujillo and go on the most beautiful hike of my life up to 4600m above sea level in Huaraz! To be able to build and install not one but two wind turbines and give them to a community that will benefit from them the most was something I’d never have dreamed I’d be able to do before I found out about WindAid, I’m so glad I did find you guys. Every part of the trip offered new exciting skills and experiences that I will remember and take away for life. Having been involved in the project group has reaffirmed my decision to pursue a career in renewable energy and I plan on getting involved with other international development opportunities in future. I’d do it all again in a heartbeat! I’m not sure I can ever quite put into words what this whole amazing experience meant to me but I gave it my best shot! I wish you guys all the success you and WindAid deserve and I’ll be sure to keep up with your future progress.”

Amy Crum : Scotland – Masters in Sustainable Engineering: Offshore Renewable Energy at Strathclyde University

“… After graduating I wanted to travel, but I needed work experience. I decided to visit Peru, see Machu Picchu, ‘find myself’ and on the way I’d drop by and do some volunteering. But WindAid turned out to be so much more than that!

The highlight of Peru was not trekking the Andes, nor surfing, nor visiting Inca ruins. It was finding myself a family- a group of people to laugh with and cherish every moment. It was stammering some newly learned Spanglish to attentive Peruvian children. It was witnessing first-hand the effects of climate change and coastal erosion. It was my first time engineering hands-on with a real, physical product.

Most of all, it was seeing the community of Playa Blanca being able to eat dinner, not in the dark or by candle light, but with lights powered and installed by WindAid. It was seeing that even me – a lucky graduate with no experience – can have a role in ‘lighting up’ these families’ lives.

I can’t thank WindAid enough for how it has changed me: my priorities, my confidence and my future. I absolutely recommend it to anyone and I absolutely will be returning… if they let me!…”

Studied Biomedical Engineering at University of Glasgow

Earth Day & Fishing in Playa Blanca

Posted on May 13, 2015 by Lewis White

This month I was lucky enough to travel to Playa Blanca for the third time to take part in the installation of WindAid’s tenth turbine. This coincided with the 45th “Earth Day”, which is marked all over the world by acts of “green” aiming to promote respect for the planet. It was my first celebration of the event and it was a great feeling to take part!

I’d like to thank the whole team for making the goal of lighting up Eleanora’s home with a wind turbine on the 22nd a reality. Working with Ben, Jack, Sn Abel, Yordi, Gean and Perry was an absolute pleasure and the past month is something I will never ever forget.

Pre-installation

Getting up early to avoid the heat of the midday sun, we headed down to the beach armed with water and sun cream. This was our last day in Playa Blanca and while the trip had already offered much excitement, we had one last activity in store. The activity involved a very old rowing boat and a heavily pregnant woman. Who’d say no to fishing in the pacific?

She had gotten up even earlier than us and we all looked on as she expertly steered the rickety boat through the surf and onto our beach. We were off; 5 of us squeezed precariously into the tiny boat which felt like a strong sneeze could take it down. As the shore got further away it finally occurred to us to offer to row, we were not pregnant after all (and we’re men..), but she was having none of it – this is what she did every day, powering this boat out into the sea was as normal as making breakfast.

Fishing

My fears about capsizing proved unfounded and we soon had the anchor in place, ready to fish. We used simple hand lines with some sort of sea louse (about an inch long with wriggly feet) as bate. Off we went, casting and waiting for about 2 hours moving the position of the boat every so often in attempt to find a shoal. Conditions weren’t perfect; apparently the sea was rougher than usual which meant a lesser chance of a big haul. Ben brought home two specimens however and Eleanora managed to get three. After she sensed we were getting tired she dropped us back at the shore and headed back out to continue her days work.

Amidst all the joking around, the better luck next time kind of thing, it occurred to me just how hard a life this must be. In Playa Blanca, stuck in the middle of Peru’s vast coastal desert, the sea is all there is to live on – a couple of bad days in the boat must be incredibly stressful as a large proportion of the food supply and along with monetary income immediately runs dry. The vast majority of the people living in Playa Blanca face this fear, but if you think that would lead to a community on edge then you’d be wrong. I’ve seen more stressed faces during an hour of a tough university exam on “Industrial Management” than I ever would if I lived for the rest of my life in Playa Blanca. People get happy, get sad but it feels like people just don’t have time to be stressed.

We had installed the turbine at Eleanora’s house the day before. This involved getting the help of half the village in lifting the tower where after we moved inside to tackle the more fiddly wiring. We noticed one corner of the building adorned with fresh flowers (a rare sight out in the desert) and a drawing of a girl. The girl, we were told, was Eleanora’s daughter who had died last year. She had passed away in hospital after complications with an infection and was only 20 years old.

Me and the turbine

This is me with the final product. Here’s to more projects with WindAid and above all more turbines!