The WorldWind Issue 2

The WorldWind Issue 2

In this second issue of the WorldWind newsletter, we give you updates on WindAid Institute’s work with wind turbines in Peru in 2016!
We hope you enjoy reading all about the current electronics project, the exploits of a recent volunteer who was all at sea in Playa Blanca and what’s happening in the volunteer house and the workshop.

Peru This Week – Lima

WindAid: Offering experience as well as electricity
“…The wind generators are constructed from scratch in a workshop on the outskirts of the coastal town of Trujillo. The hands-on work with locally sourced materials is what makes the experience so attractive to engineering students with sustainability in mind. “They think they’re coming to just put things together,” said Rivas, who also trains volunteers alongside Trujillan engineers Gean Bohuitron and Abel Yupanqui, “And then they go, ‘Whoa, I’m getting a full blown engineering experience!’” The NGO will take volunteers of most any background however, and orient them to make everyone useful in the shop. It’s not just about building a modern marvel, after all, but understanding a culture and a country…..”

Northampton Community College students help set Guinness World Record in Peru

Guinness World Record in Peru “…As one of the world’s fastest-receding glaciers, Pastoruri is a tourist destination. The turbine brings electricity to shop owners, guides and cooks who serve tourists headed to see the glacier, said Christine Armstrong, the NCC associate professor of communication who designed the study-abroad course. Students say it was a life-changing trip that reinforced their belief in the power of volunteerism while exposing them to a foreign culture. It also built strong bonds between a group of strangers, who by the end of the trip were relying on one another….”

The Huaraz Telegraph

Installation of Highest Wind Turbine
“…At an altitude over 5,000 metres, it will be the highest-located wind generator in the world. The commissioning and installing were carried out by volunteer engineers from several countries and will serve to provide electricity to the stores located at the grounds of the Pasto Ruri glacier. It has shown that it is possible to produce clean energy in remote locations using the benefices of renewable energy, although about 40% of the rural population of Peru still isn’t connected to any form of electric supply….”